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More on How to Access your Curriculum

When you purchase your downloadable curriculum through the French Curriculum Club, your Paypal receipt should contain a username and password field in the product description. To access your product(s), you must use the same username and password as indicated in your receipt.

I recently had a customer who had trouble accessing her materials because these fields came back blank. (As posted previously, I have had some issues with my Paypal interface lately!) Please email me if you have any difficulty accessing your products and I will see to it that you are able to retrieve your curriculum!

Shipping Charges

Note: Thankfully, all orders are now being processed through one location, our cool Curriculum Shop.

I am still trying to get the difficulties with shipping charges worked out. I seemed to have everything set up properly and suddenly it all started to malfunction! I managed to convince my Paypal buttons not to charge shipping on downloadables, but then they weren’t charging shipping on anything!

My fix, for now, is to set up the downloadable products at the French Curriculum Club in U.S. dollars to charge NO shipping, and the hard copy products at the Shop in Canadian dollars to charge the rates set by Canada Post.

UPDATE: If you would like to order downloadables of single items from the shop, such as workbooks, these will need to be processed manually.

I apologize for any inconvenience!

Technical Difficulties

My apologies to those who have had trouble recently with the downloadables. It seems that my Paypal buttons have decided to start adding shipping charges to downloadable purchases, despite the fact that they were set up to charge NO shipping charges on downloadable material. I am working to find out just what the problem is and to get this fixed asap!
Thank you for your patience!

Forming the Negative in French – ne…pas

pas-de-deux
To form the negative in French, we usually use two little words, ne and pas. We place ne in front of the verb and pas after the verb. English mostly gets by with one word, not. For example:

French     je vais     je ne vais pas
English     I am going     I am not going

We can see that ne and not are very similar; both can make the sentence negative. But where does this extra little word “pas” come from?

The word “pas” in French also has another meaning. It is a noun that means “step,” as in to take a step forward. If you are a ballet fan, you have heard of the expression “pas de deux” used to describe a dance for two people.

Linguists tell us that the use of pas as a negative came from people using pas in its original meaning of a step.

Just as in English we might say “I am not walking one step,” in French the expression at one time was “je ne march pas,” with the meaning of “I am not walking a step.”

This use of pas became extended to apply in other cases also, and so evolved into the present day use of pas in most negative sentences.

This process of turning a noun, verb, or adjective into a grammatical word is called “grammaticalization” by those who study the history and evolution of languages. The French use of pas is just one example of this.

Make Record Keeping Easy in Your Homeschool

reading togetherAs a homeschooling mom for 18 years, I was never much at record keeping. Each year I vowed I would dutifully keep track of every remotely educational thing my sweeties did every day. Each year I failed miserably at this!

Thankfully, I always made sure that my kids were working from a well laid-out curriculum. This ensured that however badly I had kept track of the daily activities, at the end of the year I could say we had completed such-and-such program and so covered all the necessary scholastic bases.

I always advise that homeschoolers, especially those who are new, work from established curricula to ensure that their children don’t have any confusing gaps in their education. That this makes record keeping easier is a great bonus!

As a French teacher at the middle school level, and even with primary students, I often had new students come into my class who were frustrated with French, and not experiencing the success they were capable of.

Often the source of this frustration was some kind of gap in their understanding. Perhaps this was some point of grammar they had never quite understood. Perhaps it was that they had not been taught French phonics and so were unsure about reading aloud.

Having a good curriculum not only makes record keeping a breeze, it also gives students a comprehensive, step by step introduction to each key concept at just the right time. A win-win situation in the homeschool and in the classroom!

Yes! You can teach French at home!

footsteps in the snowSometimes homeschooling parents can be a bit intimidated by the idea of teaching French at home. Teaching a second language is like teaching any other subject, though. You can get started even though you’re not an expert. You might just be pleasantly surprised to find yourself learning right alongside your children.

When I was homeschooling, I took it for granted that I didn’t know everything. The children and I traveled together on our adventure in home education. While they were impressed that Mom knew a whole lot of stuff about a whole lot of stuff, my children didn’t ever expect me to know everything there was to know about any giving topic. What I didn’t know, we found out together. What a great lesson for my kids to see that there is no age limit to learning!

Why should learning French as a second language be any different? With the right user-friendly curriculum, you can learn right along with your children as you progress though the material. Even though you might have little to no experience with French, you really can make French a part of your homeschool curriculum.

L’Art de lire was designed originally for homeschooling parents, keeping in mind that not everyone has a strong background in the French language. It starts out very gently and gradually, building understanding and confidence as a strong foundation for success.

Skating the Rideau Canal

skating on the Rideau Canal, Ottawa, Canada
Most of you know that I am proud to live in the beautiful country of Canada, where we not only learn both English and French, but also enjoy four varied seasons throughout the year. While winter can be a challenge, with its cold and snow, we Canadians have learned to celebrate it!

Winter is especially beautiful in the capital city of Ottawa. The National Capital Commission transforms the Rideau Canal into the world’s longest ice rink. There are 7.8 kilometres (5 miles) of ice to enjoy. Even if you don’t skate, it’s fun to watch the skaters on the Rideau Canal.

For pictures, videos, more information about the Rideau Canal and an update on current ice conditions, visit:

The Official Rideau Canal Website

Vive le vent d’hiver !

French Adjectives – Agreement in Number and Gender

Adjectives, words that describe people, places, things, or ideas, bring life and color to our writing and speech. They describe things so that the reader or listener can get a truer picture of what the author or speaker is talking about.

Which of these sounds more appealing? A glass of iced tea, or a tall, cool glass of sweet, refreshing, iced tea? Adjectives are essential to good communication.

In English, nouns don’t have gender so the adjective stays the same, no matter what we are describing. It makes no difference whether we are writing about a tall boy or a tall girl; we still use tall. Even when we are describing more than one thing, such as tall boys and tall girls, the adjective doesn’t change.

When it comes to adjectives in French, though, things are more complicated. Continue reading

L’Art de lire 1

Lire1-wb-cover

L’Art de lire combines beginning conversational French with an introduction to French phonics, enabling children to read simple stories in French from the first lesson. Includes verb conjugations, grammar, and conversational French.

L’Art de lire 1 is designed for beginning French students who are reading well in English. The grammar taught in this course corresponds to the Ontario, Canada expectations for Core French Curriculum for grade four (French as a second language).

The program is suitable, however, for older beginners. Even students who have had some French can benefit from the material taught in this first level of L’Art de lire. Many students who have struggled with French in the classroom, or using other French programs for homeschooling, have found that the beginning levels of L’Art de lire have filled in the gaps and enabled them to understand and enjoy learning French.

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Membership FAQ

How does The Curriculum Club at Nallenart benefit my school or homeschool?

Cost Savings

The most obvious benefit of The French Curriculum Club as a resource delivery system is its cost savings to your school or family. You pay for access to downloadable resources which you are then free to use for the duration of your subscription. You may reproduce work pages, listen to mp3 audio files, download slideshows and podcasts, and equip your students at a much lower cost than purchasing consumable workbooks every year. There are also no shipping and handling fees.

Instant Access

In addition to low cost, The Nallenart Curriculum Club offers you the convenience of instant access to your curriculum and teaching aids. Simply login and begin to prepare your lessons.

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